“Dibagan” by Brian Kim Stefans and Geniwate

Screen capture from “Dibagan” by Brian Kim Stefans and Geniwate. Extremely low resolution photograph of military ground forces in a warzone. Prominent blood splatter dominates left side of screen. Scattered words camoflage with the background. Text: "fisheye, consuming, history, knowledge, through, in the is, now, death, blood, confusion, forever, television, stumbling"
Open “Dibagan” by Brian Kim Stefans and Geniwate

In this collaborative poem Geniwate takes a relatively simple interface and page space designed by Stefans and makes it powerfully political. The audio recording of a reporter telling the story of surviving an RPG attack in Iraq, along with a photograph with a large drop of blood on the lens, make for a chilling backdrop for the poem. With this frame of reference set, the poem is presented as a stack of words at the base of five columns, which the reader can position by placing the mouse on the base of a column until it reaches the desired height on the screen. It takes some time to place and read the words on each column (which are readable both vertically and horizontally), which allows the looping audio clip and changing hues on the image clip to sink in for a visceral experience.

“untitled(to reconstruct)” by Jason Nelson and Jody Zellen

Screen capture from "untitled(to reconstruct)" by Jason Nelson and Jody Zellen. Grey background with cyan images and letters scattered throughout the image. Text: "City" "to reconstruct" "human beings from" "The observer" "images"
Open “untitled(to reconstruct)” by Jason Nelson and Jody Zellen

This collaborative poem places the same text Jody Zellen wrote for “Cut to the Flesh” into a page space designed by Jason Nelson (originally for “Branch/Branch” and “A Tree with Managers and Jittery Boats”). This tree structure is a fascinating way to organize lines of verse because it creates multiple possible readings as the reader opens up branches in the hierarchy. Its cascading effect is reminiscent of William Carlos Williams’ variable foot, richly analyzed by Eleanor Berry and many others as follows:

The variable foot has been taken as (1) a temporal unit, each step of a triadic line being equal in duration to every other (Donoghue, Weatherhead, Breslin); (2) a stress-based unit, each step of a triadic line containing a single major stress (Duncan, Hedges); (3) a syntactical unit, each step of a triadic line being a single complete phrase or clause (Solt, Hofstadter); (4) a unit of meaning or attention (Goodman, Hofstadter); (5) a unit of phrasing in reading, the triadic lineation constituting a score for performance (Wagner); and (6) a visual unit (Shapiro, Perloff, Sayre, Cushman).

Read more“untitled(to reconstruct)” by Jason Nelson and Jody Zellen

“Clippings” by Jason Nelson and Pedro Valdeomillos

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“Clippings” by Jason Nelson and Pedro Valdeomillos

This collaborative narrative was written by Valdeomillos on a page space developed by Jason Nelson for his poems “Dreamaphage” (the first version) and “Between Treacherous Objects.” This space creates spatial layers with an intuitive navigational interface that allows readers to pan, scan, and move back and forth through layers each of which reveals a portion of the narrative, which is structured by a conversation about memory, photography, past, present, and how much you might know someone that you love. The images, textual arrangements, and layers create clusters of spatially organized language that gesture towards poetry with its lines of verse and stanzas.

Take a look at Jason Nelson’s poems built from this engine and notice how their structure is so different from how Valdeomillos arranges his narrative in this piece, attesting to the versatility of Nelson’s page space.

“Biggz” by Loss Pequeño Glazier and Simon Biggs

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“Biggz” by Loss Pequeño Glazier and Simon Biggs

This generative poem is built from four elements: an image, a caption, lines of verse by Simon Biggs, and a JavaScript framework Glazier developed for “White-Faced Bromeliads on 20 Hectares.” The poem and its contextual information are randomly generated whenever the page is loaded, reloaded, or every 20 seconds— which makes a marked difference in how one reads and conceptualizes the poem when compared to “White-Faced Bromeliads,” which refreshes every 10 seconds. Biggs’ lines of verse are perfectly grammatical, but unconventional in its logical formulations in the tradition of Language Poetry or Gertrude Stein, which makes them stand up well to the page’s generative engine.

Read more“Biggz” by Loss Pequeño Glazier and Simon Biggs

“Pause” by Jody Zellen

“Pause” by Jody Zellen

“All the News that’s Fit to Print” by Jody Zellen

Screen capture from "All the News that's Fit to Print" by Jody Zellen. The image looks like the page of a newspaper with the image of a flood in a parking lot and a headline which says: "Forget the career. My parents need me at home".
Open “All the News that’s Fit to Print” by Jody Zellen

“Inanimate Alice Episode #3: Russia” by Kate Pullinger and Chris Joseph

Screen capture of "Inanimate Alice Episode #3: Russia" by Kate Pullinger and Chris Joseph. Six lines of white text on black background. Text: "I hear voices / Loud voices / Men / Every once in a while / my mom shouts / Her voice is the loudest"
Open “Inanimate Alice Episode #3: Russia” by Kate Pullinger and Chris Joseph

“Between Treacherous Objects” by Jason Nelson

"Between Treacherous Objects" by Jason Nelson
“Between Treacherous Objects” by Jason Nelson

“Five by Five” by Dan Waber and Jason Pimble

Screen capture from "Five by Five" by Dan Waber and Jason Pimble. Black text on a white background. Words aligned three-dimensionally towards the center of the. Text: "sun, filled, eyes, always, left" text continues to shrink, becoming illegible.
Open “Five by Five” by Dan Waber and Jason Pimble

“You’re lying and you filter…” by Paul Bogaert

"You’re lying and you filter…" by Paul Bogaert
Open: “You’re lying and you filter…” by Paul Bogaert