“@Tempspence” & “#tempspencepoets” by Mark Marino, Rob Wittig, et. al.

“Reality: Being @SpencerPratt” by Mark Marino and Rob Wittig

 

“Occupy MLA” by Mark C. Marino and Rob Wittig

Occupy MLA is back!

Screen capture of “Occupy MLA” by Mark C. Marino and Rob Wittig. Twitter cover is a picture of an empty journal with a big, red "O" on it. Twitter profile picture writes "occupy MLA," followed by a lengthy description of the twitter account.
Open “Occupy MLA” by Mark C. Marino and Rob Wittig

But don’t be alarmed just yet, since this resurgence of the controversial netprov, takes the shape of a published archive (linked to in this entry’s title). This documentation is exemplary, including a 3-minute introductory video, a link to an artists’ statement at The Chronicle of Higher Education (with a fascinating comment thread), an indexed and color-coded archive of the tweets, and an Excel file with the raw data from the four Twitter accounts that form the heart of this work. With this resource, you can read most of this timely performance that blurs the lines between fiction and reality, satire and activism, and virtual and embodied spaces.

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“Cthalloween” by Jay Bushman, Kris Kowall, Ryan Paul, Josh Lewis, et. al.

“Sootfall” by Arianna Gass, Reed Gaines, et. al.

Screen capture of “Sootfall” by Arianna Gass, Reed Gaines, et. al. A picture of the night sky. No stars are visible and the sun is still shining from its final setting stage. Night overcomes day, but the sun has still not fully setted. The text is at the middle, at the top of the picture in white letters. Text: “#SOOTFALL”.
Open “Sootfall” by Arianna Gass, Reed Gaines, et. al.

On February 4, 2013 as the eastern seaboard of the United States was blanketed in a snowstorm (and the Twittersphere with weather reports), another kind of precipitation started to accumulate around the fictional town of Troy. As its inhabitants tweeted about this odd weather, this mysterious black substance began to be identified in their streams as #sootfall, providing readers a way to identify tweets related to this phenomenon and begin to follow narrative threads around this curious event.

Read more“Sootfall” by Arianna Gass, Reed Gaines, et. al.