«Letters Demand Things» por Michael Madsen

"Letters Demand Things" by Michael Madsen. Black letters float in the foreground in front of what looks like a crack in some blinds. Text: "(random letters)"
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«Soundpoem I and Soundpoem II» por Jörg Piringer

Screen capture from “Soundpoem 1 and Soundpoem 2” by Jörg Piringer. Yellow green background with six lines of little gray rectangles and letters in some. Three of them form two separate rectangles in the center with black little checkmarks in the left side of the left lines and 1 square on each line of the right lines are red. Text in the rectangles: “a, xa, o, to, up, pu, xa, xa, ot, ot, pu, pu”. Text above the two rectangle rows: “press the buttons to change the sound”. Text in the top left corner: “[soundpoem two]”. Text in the left bottom corner: “[jörg piringer’s home]”
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«Orbital» por Max Dunlop y Neil Jenkins

Screen caption of "Orbital" by Max Dunlop and Neil Jenkins . Blue-gray background with white text concentrated on the middle. Black text appears on the bottom.
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«Conversation» por Jason Nelson

conversationinjury
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«Breathing/Secret of Roe» por Jonathan Carr

breathing
«Breathing/Secret of Roe» por Jonathan Carr

«Sky» por Mitchell Kimbrough

Screen capture from "Sky" by Mitchell Kimbrough. Black backround with white dots and a moon representing the night sky. Text: "always a/ little almost/ might have".
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«I Cried Of Course» por William Minor, Elise Rotchford, y Steve Minor

Screen capture from "I Cried Of Course" by William Minor, Elise Rotchford, and Steve Minor. A black-and-white cutout of a old-timey photograph depicting a woman with bobbed hair and a long, polka-dotted dress; the poem is displayed on a note to the side, and its last two lines are written in hand; dark blue barckground. Text: "I cried of course when they told me / you were dead. / Frankly I'd forgotten / already, Brigadoon / (you called me that when, good for a night, a day, I failed to return) / Your nineteen-year-old body bruised to the touch. / Not dramatic this: / the simple erratic division of cells. / (In handwriting) 'Now it is the hand of death / That grants the gift of life itself'.'"
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«Blinding Lights» por Adrianna de Barros

"Blinding Lights" by Adrianna de Barros
«Blinding Lights» por Adrianna de Barros

«The Garden of Proserpine (excerpt)» por A. C. Swinburne y Laura McCabe

Screen capture from “The Garden of Proserpine”. The picture’s background has some sort of red crystal figures, but are undetectable due to the darkness that surrounds it. Text: “Whatever gods may be/ That no life lives for ever/ That dead men rise up never/ That even the weakleast river”. The text is placed at the left side of the picture and they are in gray color, except for the line “That no life lives for ever”.
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«dear e.e.» por Loris Janis e Ingrid Ankerson

Screen capture from "dear e.e." by Loris Janis and Ingrid Ankerson. White rectangle containing stylized text from the poem overlaid against a skewed black rectangle. Text: "i dreamt of you last/night- you had snuck into my/apartment (i don't even have/one) to re arrange it all;"
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Este poema caprichoso invoca a uno de los maestros de la poesía idiosincrásica, E. E. Cummings. Cummings usó las mayúsculas, los espacios, la puntuación, las letras y las palabras de formas muy poco convencionales para crear experiencias poéticas fuera de lo común. El sueño del hablante aprovecha esta idea, al tener e.e. reorganiza los muebles de maneras contraintuitivas. Una interfaz simple para navegar de lado a lado presenta diferentes elementos de mobiliario, que revelan textos y animaciones breves hacia nuevas imágenes cuando el lector coloca el puntero sobre ellas. Tal vez esta es una metáfora de la poética de Cummings, quien reorganizó las letras y las palabras para llevar a nuevas percepciones de las cosas ordinarias. Vea r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r para un ejemplo divertido de esto, y otro poema electrónico inspirado por Cummings, «The Sweet Old Etcetera» de Allison Clifford.