I ♥ E-Poetry Nominated for 2013 DH Awards

2013 DH Awards
Vote for I ♥ E-Poetry in the 2013 Digital Humanities Awards.

I ♥ E-Poetry has been nominated for the 2013 Digital Humanities Awards in the “Best DH project for public audiences” category.

Last year, I ♥ E-Poetry competed in 2012 DH Awards and was the first runner up in the “Best DH blog, article, or short publication” category. Back in 2012, the project was a bit different– a blogging performance in which I read an e-poem and wrote about it every day in a minimalist Tumblr designed for serendipitous or serial exploration. But 2013 saw several changes, especially when I concluded Phase 1 on May 2, 2013. Following the guidance offered by my Advisory Board, I moved the site to WordPress, changed its URL to iloveepoetry.com, and started to develop resources for audiences to better access the knowledge base it had become. I also opened it up to collaboration and guest entries with five CFPs, launching Phase Two, which brought in new contributors from around the world. For a detailed recap of the year, read I ♥ E-Poetry: Year Two Retrospective.

If you are new to this resource, read the About page, get to know its team, and explore its menu and sidebars, both of which offer deep access to its over 570 entries. Explore I ♥ E-Poetry and discover our loving obsession with language and how it inhabits digital spaces.

And if you like what it has to offer, support it with your vote.

Thank you!

Leonardo Flores, PhD

 

“Pieces of Herself” by Juliet Davis

Juliet Davis pieces of herself
Open “Pieces of Herself” by Juliet Davis

Davis portrays her view on theories of how women are seen in society by using pictures and interactive digital media. “Pieces of Herself” uses a drag and drop interface by using a dress-up doll which gives readers opportunities to customize their exploration of the poem. The character is portrayed as a kind of dress-up doll that appears on the left side of the window, while readers visit the woman’s house and discover different items to place on her. Every time something is placed on the dress-up doll, it triggers an audio clip and a short, looping animation that remains on the doll. The fact that we cannot remove any of these animations is a comment on the irrevocable layering of experiences on a young woman as she is shaped by the world that surrounds her.

As you explore the poem, notice the speaker’s tone when describing the scenery. What importance does the phrase bring to the poem’s context? Colors and images emerge as the mouse clicks on the interface, and each one has a special meaning to the doll’s life. Consider the small visual and aural parts of the work and search for the meaning of every sound individually and as it combines to produce a complete artistic experience.

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I ♥ E-Poetry Fall 2013 Interns

Cynthia Román and Ian Rolón
Fall 2013 Interns: Cynthia Román and Ian Rolón

During the Fall 2013 semester, I ♥ E-Poetry was graced by its first generation of interns: students enrolled in an interdisciplinary course titled INTD 4995, which I titled “Digital Humanities Internship.” The two remarkable students enrolled in this course had to complete a series of tasks which helped restore I ♥ E-Poetry to full functionality and expanded its resources. In exchange, they earned college credits for learning and developing 21st century skills in the Digital Humanities. Here’s a list of the tasks assigned to them.

Read moreI ♥ E-Poetry Fall 2013 Interns

“Paperwounds,” by Andy Campbell

Screen capture of “Paperwounds,” by Andy Campbell. Black backround. Picture of a wrinkled paper.
Open “Paper Wounds,” by Andy Campbell

“Paperwounds,” is an intimate look into the sometimes-surreal, often-manic realm of the suicidal and depressed. It is an intense snapshot of the numerous facets that go into the decision of taking one’s own life, each of its disparate parts aligning to form a piecemeal narrative readers may only ever really guess at in its entirety. Presented as a crumpled up piece of paper, readers “unwrap” the suicide note by clicking on the highlighted/pulsating words within its folds. Doing so exhumes other, shorter notes the writer placed within the virtual letter, each one a different illustration of–perhaps–what drove the fictional victim to this ultimate negation of self. The interface, technological sounds, and brief animations when you mouse over certain texts combined with the ruined state of the materials create a forensic tone for the work, casting the reader in the role of an investigator. The poem may be zoomed in on, zoomed out from, flipped, rotated, dimmed, and made completely invisible–though doing any of the aforementioned does not seem to change the nature of the text at first glance.

Read more“Paperwounds,” by Andy Campbell