“Disposable Language” by Talan Memmott, et. al.

http://vimeo.com/42561018

“Disposable Language” by Talan Memmott, et. al.

This performance is based on Memmott’s video poem “NONCE.EXECUTOR” a poem that juxtaposes words with phrases and images that somehow define or describe them. The dancers are positioned between the screen and a disheveled blonde doll sitting on the front of the stage with a spotlight shining on it. The dancers’ movements are very doll-like, making stiff movements that emphasize their joints and how they bend and rotate on dolls. Are the dancers an explanation or description of the doll?

The title and the performance are reminiscent of Memmott’s Taroko Gorge remix, “Toy Garbage,” a poem that shares his darkly satirical vision.

“Disposable Language”
Choreography: Ashley Peters
Poetry: Talan Memmott (“NONCE.EXECUTOR”)
Dancers: Samantha Crosby, Danielle Delong, Julie Marazzo, Kristina Merrill, Shannon Moore,
Megan Rutkowski, Holli Simme, Julia Tomanovich, Emily Wilhelm

“Expansive Mayhem” by Loss P. Glazier, et. al.

http://vimeo.com/42561019

“Expansive Mayhem” by Loss P. Glazier, et. al.

The poem that covers the back wall is Glazier’s “Io Sono at Swoons,” a generative work he describes as follows:

Io Sono At Swoons is a poem/program that refreshes every forty seconds with a new iteration of text on the screen. It is virtually impossible that the reader will ever see the same poem twice. Drawing from the experience of a concussion, Io Sono presents collages of lexical fragments from various languages, including medical terminology related to the brain, which come together in compound formations rich with multilingual inflection.

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“Language to Cover a Wall: Introduction” by Loss P. Glazier, et. al.

http://vimeo.com/42558313

“Language to Cover a Wall: Introduction” by Loss P. Glazier, et. al.

The opening performance in “Language to Cover a Wall” is about the word made flesh: Glazier reads his poem “Etymon / Encarnación” while a young woman dances to the rhythms of his voice. The words juxtaposed in the title both gesture towards primeval origins of language: etymon refers to the origins of words, while encarnación is about the immaterial gaining a body. And we can’t help but notice the bodies on stage: Glazier sitting in a chair, reading his poem engrossed in the words on the page, gently swaying like José Feliciano. The contrast of a young female dancer in a white dress, interpreting lines of sounded breath with her body, bending her articulations with an agility matched only by the poet’s vocal articulation of the poem.

This introduction sets the tone for the whole show. This is language that will cover a wall, resound through a vocal tract, and move two bodies so they will dance together, each in their own way.

Introduction
Poetry: Loss Pequeño Glazier (“Etymon / Encarnación”)*
Dancer: Sarah Burns

“The LA Flood Project” by Mark C. Marino

Screen capture from “The LA Flood Project” by Mark C. Marino. A screen capture of a search in Google maps. On the right side  there is the picture of the map via satellite and on the left there is a list of locations and a description of each. These locations are marked in the map with a blue pin. The text is hardly visible.
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“a show of hands” by Mark C. Marino

Screen capture from "a show of hands" by Mark C. Marino. White background with black font.
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“Fields of Dream” by Nick Montfort and Rachel Stevens

Screen capture from "Fields of Dream" by Nick Montfort and Rachel Stevens. Numerous empty fields with different names. Text: "Man Of War/Lady Of Peace/goat/python/cougar/re-arming/weapons/magazines"
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“The Ballad of Workstudy Seth” by Mark C. Marino

Screen shot from “The Ballad of Workstudy Seth” by Mark C. Marino. Gray background with black text. Text: “Marino haz resortd 2 idol threatz from othr peoplz fazebook & twittR accountz. VERY Agent Smith, but he cant stop the ONE: #workstudyseth… (ETC)”
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“Labyrinth: The Rulebook Without Game” by Mark C. Marino

Screen capture of "Labyrinth: The Rulebook Without Game" by Mark C. Marino. An interface displays a role-playing narrative with many different user options. Text: "Geisten's Notes... Hints and Spoilers / Sim/Sim / Geisten Machina: Who is this rakish fellow? Invisible. Pervasive. / Purveying. / I rather like the sound of him. / Kind of a cagey computer counterspy, / John Cagey, no less. / Perhaps we will meet him soon..."
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“Stravinsky’s Muse” by Mark C. Marino

Screen shot from “Stravinsky’s Muse” by Mark C. Marino. Baby blue background. The text is in black and there is a circle in the middle with other circles inside and in different positions forming some sort of atom. There are words scattered all over the circle: “Her, Teacher, with, and, Platonic/friend, Agape, She”. There are also three squares with a text inside them. This squares are in 3 corners of the picture: Two on the above corners and one in the left corner, down. Text in the left, upper side: “Promenade:/ A call to/ dance.” Text in the left, lower side: “ ‘Dosido’ , Natasha/ said./ Avec moi? he asked./ Music was their/ vernacular. The/ language mattered/ little.” Text in the upper right corner: “Out of the/ corner of his/ eye as he/ spun he/ thought he/ spied her.”
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“What the Nightwoman Texted” by Mark Marino

Screen capture from "What the Nightwoman Texted" by Mark Marino. Image of a painted landscape with a few words scattered around the image. These words seem to blend in with the image of the landscape mainly due to their color scheme being almost identical to that of the landscape.
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